Tag Archives: fundraising

One more race to go…

Updated 1 January: we raised almost $60,000 for the GBS/CIDP Foundation! The campaign is now over, and regular blog posts will resume sometime soon.

Updated 23 December: we’ve now raised over $53,000 for the GBS/CIDP Foundation! Thank you to all of you for your generosity since I wrote this blog post. You can still donate: let’s see how much we can raise! The new deal is I’ll donate $1 for every $1 you donate, and Google will match my donation. So, every dollar you donates results in $3 being donated!

Cliff notes version: donate now to our fundraiser for the GBS/CIDP Foundation, and we’ll donate four two dollars for every dollar you donate! There’s only 11 days to go!

Zoom Turkey Trot 2015

Zoom Turkey Trot 2015

Help us raise $6,000 more for a good cause

It’s been ten months since I shared the story of having GBS in 2009. Six years later, I’ve decided to turn a negative experience into a positive one. It’s been quite a journey — we’ve now run 51 races of the 52 races I promised I’d run to raise awareness for the GBS/CIDP Foundation, and we’ve raised $46,000 $53,000 of the $52,000 I’ve promised to raise. Pretty good news! But the problem is there’s now only 11 days left to raise the remaining $6,000!

I’m sure there’s no lack of desire from many of you to donate. I know, I know: you keep forgetting and you’re really busy. Well, let me try and help get you motivated: if you donate a dollar, I’ve orchestrated a scheme to donate another four two dollars. That’s right, your $1 results in $5 $3 going to the GBS/CIDP Foundation, and your contribution is tax deductible. (Small print: I’ll do this for the next $1,500 that you donate.)

So, donate now by visiting this link. If everyone donates a total of $1,200, we’ve met our goal! We’ve met our goal, but let’s keep going right up to December 31!IMG_7203

How are we doing this?  I recently received a $1,500 per diem for advising work, and I’ve decided to put it up to match your donations to the fundraiser. I’ve also decided I’ll put in one more dollar of my own hard-earned savings to match it. Then, my fantastic employer Google matches donations that I make. So, all up, when you put in $1, I put in $2 $1, and Google puts in $2 $1 more to make it a total of $5 $3.

That’s it. Eleven days to go, let’s get this done!

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Thank you…

 

We’ve had amazing support throughout this fundraiser. Almost 200 people and organizations contributed, and I owe them all a ton of thanks for helping raise awareness of GBS and related conditions, and helping the important work of the GBS/CIDP Foundation. A complete list of contributors is here.

 

 

 

$42,000 raised for the GBS/CIDP Foundation

After suffering from GBS in 2009, I’ve been on a mission to raise $52,000 for the important work of the GBS/CIDP Foundation. They’re a small non-profit with an enormous heart, and they do genuine good for people suffering from rare, debilitating conditions.

You, yes you. You should donate!

You, yes you. You should donate!

We now have less than $10,000 to go to raise our goal of $52,000!  Here’s your big chance to donate and drive us home to the goal, or to convince that family member, friend, or your workplace to help us get it done. We won’t stop when we get to $52,000 — just imagine how much we can raise if we make the goal with four months of the year left!

These feet are ready to race

These feet are ready to race

What’s been happening?

I’m not just raising money, I’m running 52 races this year to raise awareness of GBS and related conditions. We’re now 25 races of the way to our goal of 52 races. I’ve written a report about races 5 through to 25, and you can read them here: http://fiftytwofives.com (just scroll down the home page). My favorite race so far is the Presidio 10k just for the beauty of running around and across the Golden Gate Bridge. The most exotic has to be a 10k race in Buenos Aires, which might also have been the toughest on a hot and humid day while I was jetlagged. There are two races that have surprised me: the Double 5k where I won $50 in prize money, and the St Lawrence Run for Fun where I accidentally won the race.

One US-stralian in a sea of Argentinians before the start of a 10k race in Buenos Aires

One US-stralian in a sea of Argentinians before the start of a 10k race in Buenos Aires

I think a lot about raising money, and I’ve learnt how hard it is to get people to open their wallets and donate. You know, I often think: what if every LinkedIn and Facebook connection I had donated just $1? We’d be about $3,000 further ahead, that’s what would happen. And imagine if they each donated $10. Wow. It’s really the smaller donations from more people that could make the difference — so please do encourage folks to donate, even if they can only afford $1 or $10. And if you haven’t donated, and you’re suddenly feeling inspired, just click here.

To those I owe thanks

We’ve had amazing support throughout this fundraiser. Almost 200 people and organizations contributed, and I owe them all a ton of thanks for helping raise awareness of GBS and related conditions, and helping the important work of the GBS/CIDP Foundation. A complete list of contributors is here.

 

$27,000. 17 Races. 98 Generous Friends!

I’ve been learning about fundraising by experience, and I now know you should lead with the donation link. So here it is! Head on over and help support my fundraiser: http://igg.me/at/fiftytwofives

A Few Thoughts on the Backstory

Crossing the line in the Bay Breeze 5k

Crossing the line in the Bay Breeze 5k

It’s almost six years since my encounter with Guillain–Barré syndrome began. I remember it well, I doubt anyone who’s had GBS would forget it. I’m happy to have it in the rear vision mirror, and to see it fading into history. I reassure myself that I’ve now got as much chance of getting GBS as anyone who’s never had it.

It took over five years to want to talk about it publicly. In hindsight, I’m not sure why. It’s been cathartic to share the story, and turn a bad experience into a fundraising experience that helps others. Perhaps it was just that talking about it brought it into the forefront of my mind, and it’s an experience I’d have rather forgotten for a while. Anyway, I feel great about doing something good with a bad experience.

Fundraising So Far

Since I began my fundraiser for the GBS/CIDP Foundation, we’ve raised over $27,000. That’s a solid effort for 4 months, but it’s still $25,000 from my goal of $52,000 in 2015. I’ve also managed to run 17 races to raise awareness of GBS and related conditions, about 33% of the way to my goal of 52 races in 2015. Running feels like a fine way to defy GBS, and I’ve heard from more than a few recovered and recovering GBS patients that they like the idea of running as a defiant act.

I maintain a separate blog about my fundraising and racing, and it’s over here at http://fiftytwofives.com. You can read the stories of my races, including my first ever unlikely victory in a race and my crazy time running in Buenos Aires. If you follow the blog, you’ll also get a near-weekly update on my fundraising escapes. If that isn’t enough, Like my page on Facebook, and you’ll get a nearly daily update in your feed.

There’s been some pretty amazing donations. I won’t pick a favorite, but I love the story of Norman Herms of Philadelphia. He mailed a check into the GBS-CIDP Foundation International with the following message: “Please give this check to Hugh Williams. I do not have a computer. I had GBS in 1988 at 55 years old. After 65 hospital days and ten days of therapy I recovered 100%”. That’s a pretty cool story.

Back when

Back when our fundraising began! January 1 in Phoenix, Arizona on a cold morning

All up, 98 people and organizations have contributed to the fundraiser. That includes 3 companies, Pivotal, Accel Partners, and Medallia. I owe them a special thanks for being corporate donors, and I hope other companies will join in too. If you’d like to be part of the story — maybe even our 100th contributor — then you can head over here and donate. There’s some cool perks too, just choose one when you contribute.

See you again soon.

 

Five races down, forty-seven to go…

I’m trying hard to get out the word out about my fundraiser for the GBS/CIDP Foundation. As I shared last week, I suffered from GBS in 2009 — and it was a tough personal experience — and now I’m running to raise awareness of GBS and funds so that the Foundation can help others. (Hopefully, I’m not driving you crazy — this is the first time I’ve attempted a personal fundraiser, and I’m feeling my way — shoot me an email if you have advice to share.)

The view at the Bay Breeze 5k -- race 5 on my way to 52 races in 2015 to raise awareness for GBS

The view at the Bay Breeze 5k — race 5 on my way to 52 races in 2015 to raise awareness for GBS

I learnt this week that three people in my network have been touched by GBS. I’m sure there’s more out there. While it’s estimated in only affects 1 or 2 people in every 100,000, it’s not that hard to find someone who’s personally experienced what it can do. But you have to be looking to find people: the scary thing about GBS is that most people haven’t heard of it (and most medical professionals don’t know the signs), and so it’s incredibly important to raise awareness and to have support from an organization that knows what to do.

Even the name of it is impossible. I had the condition for a few weeks before I could pronounce it properly. For what it’s worth, it’s GHEE-N BAR-A syndrome.

I’m sharing the stories of my 52 races through my Facebook page http://facebook.com/fiftytwofives, and on my fundraising blog fiftytwofives. I just published a new piece on my race yesterday — I hope you enjoy it.

I know you’re all busy, and it’s hard to find time to donate, but I’d really appreciate it if you can find the time and want to help out. I’ve got a long way to go to get to $52k. Head over to http://igg.me/at/fiftytwofives, and I promise it’ll only take 2 or 3 minutes to hand over some cash. Choose a “perk” while you’re there — my favorite is the t-shirt when you donate $100, which will include *your name* on the back as one of my major sponsors.

See you next time.